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There is no unified global list of residency policies, so this page attempts to index as much information as is available.

Requirements to Become a Resident[]

Links to Articles[]

  • September 2014 (archived version as original is no longer available)
  • August 2016 (some rules apply retroactively to May 2016) (link updated 2019-01-15)

Pre-September 2014[]

  • No residency requirements. Players may declare which region they want to be residents of when residency begins, based on where they have been previously playing.

September 2014 - May 11, 2015[]

  • Players must live in a region for 2 years to become residents.
  • See here for additional details (archive of the original text from LoL Esports).

May 11, 2015 - Aug 1, 2016[]

  • Participate in (started in >= 50% of matches in the regular season) for 8 of the last 12 splits
  • Time accrued under the old setup does count towards this
  • In China - "Players who don't have China mainland IDs who joined LPL before 1st August, 2016, who spent 48+ months in the last 72 months living in mainland China (counting from his first time in LPL, LSPL, LDL or Worlds etc) can apply for residency. Players who joined after need ID."[1][2]

After August 1, 2016[]

  • "If a player becomes a lawful permanent resident of a region after having played in it as a non-resident, he may petition for IMP resident status with his region’s league administrators."[3]

Additional Policies[]

  • The residency a player has when initially entering the competitive scene is based on their country (or countries) of citizenship or legal residency, regardless of what region(s) the player has actually competed in. A Korean player will always be considered a Korean resident until they fulfill one of the above requirements, even if they never play in a Korean tournament.
    • Although players from Hong Kong and Macao are legally Chinese citizens, they require permits to work in mainland China, and are part of the PCS for residency purposes.[4]
  • "A player may only be an IMP resident of a single region at any point in time. Upon joining an Active Roster, a player will be considered a non-resident until and unless they declare themselves a resident (and can provide the proper credentials)."[3]
  • "Players who have lawful permanent resident status in multiple regions (e.g. dual-citizens) cannot be an IMP resident of two regions simultaneously. After declaring residency in one region in which they are eligible, in order to switch residency from one region to the other, they must first have participated in at least 50% of regular season matches of their team within that region in its most recent split."[3]
  • Players will never be forced to change residency. In particular, for grandfathered residents under an earlier policy, "If a player has inherited IMP resident status in a region due to meeting the time-based requirement of the old IMP policy, but is a citizen (or any other lawful permanent classification) of a country in another region, they may switch to IMP resident status in the latter region at any point. However, in doing so, they relinquish the inherited IMP resident status in the former region, and can only get it back by obtaining lawful permanent resident status and submitting a petition to the league."[3]

Policies for Coaches[]

  • Riot has never articulated a policy for coaches gaining residency, so it is assumed that they cannot unless they are also players. Although residency for coaches is tracked in the Global Contract Database for some regions, there is no known situation in which a coach's residency would come into play, as no region restricts the residency of coaches.

Players from Regionless Countries[]

  • Riot has never articulated a policy for handling residency for players who are residents of a country that does not fall within one of the competitive regions. This rarely comes into play as most countries outside of competitive regions have an insignificant or nonexistent professional League of Legends scene. However, players from the Middle East and North Africa appear to be considered residents of that "region", despite there being no official Riot-run circuit there. Thus, they are non-residents in every established region. It is unclear if these players would acquire residency in an established region through the same processes as other players, or if different rules would apply.

Historical Region Changes[]

LAN & LAS[]

  • At the start of the 2015 season, Latin America split into LAN & LAS, but prior to this time official residency did not exist, so there were no official residency changes as a result.
  • In November 2018 (approximately), all LAN & LAS residents became residents of Latin America, as the region re-unified.

Peru[]

  • In January 2018, all Peruvian players were given the choice to declare LAN or LAS, as the country moved from LAN to LAS.

Vietnam[]

  • In February 2018, all SEA residents from Vietnam became Vietnam residents with the introduction of the region.

PCS[]

  • In January 2020, all LMS and SEA residents became PCS residents with the merger of the two regions.

OCE[]

  • In October 2020, the Oceania competitive region was dissolved and all Oceanic residents became North American residents.
    • Note that despite the OPL's disbandment following the 2020 season, the Oceania competitive region was reformed as the LCO, therefore Oceanic residency is still considered valid while retaining resident status in North America.

IMP Players[]

NA
North America
[]

Initially Selected Residency[]

Resident via Permanent Residency[]

  • KR
    Huhi - since July 16, 2018
  • KR
    Ssumday - since April 19, 2021
  • KR
    Arrow - since May 2021 (approx.)
  • KR
    Gamsu - since May 2021 (approx.)
  • EU
    Alex Ich (would gain residency if he plays again)

Resident via IMP[]

  • KR
    Impact - since October 31, 2018
  • KR
    Piglet - since November 7, 2018
  • EU
    Jensen - since May 29, 2019
  • KR
    Fenix - since November 10, 2019
  • EU
    Svenskeren - since December 18, 2019
  • KR
    Huni - since November 16, 2020

Future Eligibility[]

Players gain residency at the start of the listed split. For any player pending residency, we will update when the GCD updates.

Players must have started playing in North America between May 11, 2015 and Aug 1, 2016 to be eligible under this policy.

EU
Europe
[]

Initially Selected Residency[]

Already Eligible[]

BR
Brazil
[]

Future Eligibility[]

  • EU
    Dioud - 1st Split 2020 (inactive)

CN
China
[]

In order to become Chinese residents, players need to both spend enough time in China to qualify for residency and apply to the LPL to receive said residency. Without an application, they are still residents of their original region.

Resident via IMP[]

  • KR
    Doinb - application accepted in December 2019
  • KR
    Scout - application accepted in June 2021

Already Eligible[]

CIS
CIS
[]

Initially Selected Residency[]

Resident via IMP[]

JP
Japan
[]

Resident via IMP[]

TR
Turkey
[]

Regionless Players[]

Countries Counting Towards Residency[]

North America[]

Canada, United States

Europe[]

The information in this section is based on information from 2020.

Albania, Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Kosovo, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom (UK), Vatican City (Holy See)

Korea[]

South Korea

China[]

The information in this section is based on information from 2015.

China, Hong Kong, Macao

PCS[]

The information in this section is based on information from 2020.

Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macao, Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand

Brazil[]

Brazil

CIS[]

The information in this section is based on information from 2015.

Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine

Japan[]

Japan

Latin America[]

The information in this section is based on information from 2018.

Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, Venezuela

Oceania[]

The information in this section is based on information from 2015.

Australia, New Zealand, Guam, New Caledonia, French Polynesia, Fiji, Northern Mariana Islands[5]

Turkey[]

Turkey - note, however, that Turkish citizenship is granted to anyone with a Turkish parent, so many players are dual citizens and can transfer between EU and TR residency within one split.

Vietnam[]

Vietnam

ERL Residency[]

  • The residency rules in the European Regional Leagues (ERL) used to slightly differ from each other, depending on the respective tournament organizer. Starting with 2020, a uniform set of rules was defined:[6]
    • ERL teams are required to have a minimum of three Locally-Trained Representatives (LTR) on their starting lineup. Starting with 2021, this is changed:[7]
      • Teams can now field up to 3 non-Locally-Trained Representatives (LTR) players, but will be required to have at least 3 LTR players in their 6-man roster.
    • Locally-Trained Representatives are defined as players who have fulfilled at least one of the following criteria:
      • The player has legally resided and been primarily present in the competitive area of the ERL for at least 36 out of the last 60 months.
      • The player has played the majority of applicable matches in the ERL for two out of the last three ERL splits.
    • A player may only be an LTR of a single ERL at any point in time.
    • A player will not be considered a representative until they have declared themselves as an LTR to the respective ERL.
  • Note that the meaning of LTR given by Riot (Locally-Trained Representative) slightly differs from an official term called 'Long-term resident'. It refers to a person, who is not a citizen of an EU country but has resided legally within its territory for five years.[8]

References[]

  1. Ran's Tweet twitter.com
  2. 2018赛季英雄联盟职业联赛正式规则 1. 队伍成员资格 (Chinese) lpl.qq.com
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Changes to the Interregional Movement Policy nexus.leagueoflegends.com
  4. There are a few very niche cases in which a player's legal citizenship would not match up to their competitive residency in League of Legends, due to them being born in an overseas territory of a country. Namely, any player from Puerto Rico would be a United States citizen but a Latin American resident and any player from New Caledonia would be a French citizen but a North American resident.
  5. Oceanic Transfer FAQ
  6. Belgian League Rulebook belgianleague.lol
  7. EBL 2021 - FORMAT, CHANGES & QUALIFIERS lol.balkanesports.com
  8. Council Directive 2003/109/EC of 25 November 2003 concerning the status of third-country nationals who are long-term residents eur-lex.europe.eu
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